Teignmouth

Teignmouth

Teignmouth is an historic port on the mouth of the river Teign estuary. It has all the attractions of a seaside town, including a Victorian pier. The town grew from its humble origins as a small fishing village to the second most popular Victorian health resort in Devon.
The town has a working harbour, with many vessels, large ships, fishing boats and pleasure craft, entering and leaving the port.   Its historic connections with the Victorian engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel responsible for the stretch of railway line which runs along the sea wall, and John Keats, who wrote part of Endymion  while living in the building now known as Keats House, make Teignmouth an interesting town to visit.
Teignmouth however did not escape the ravages of war. It suffered an invasion by the French in 1690 when the western half of the town was destroyed and again the town was partially destroyed from the air during the Second World War resulting in the mixture of architectural styles visible around the town- the Victorian buildings lining the seafront and the Georgian town cottages in the streets behind.
Along the seaward edge of the town is The Den, a large open space with lawns and flower beds that runs along the length of the town. This is where many of the town's holiday activities take place.
Today Teignmouth is an attractive town where residents and tourists can marvel at the sunset over the meandering river Teign, enjoy the superb views towards Dartmoor or take a leisurely walk along the promenade.

Perros-Guirec

Perros Guirec Perros-Guirec, situated on the north coast of Brittany is noted for its beautiful coastline. The name Perros-Guirec is derived from the Breton language.  Linguistically and ethnically, Bretons have more in common with the Irish and the Welsh than with the French. Perros in the Breton language means Cap or extremity descending to the sea. This chic resort perched on a rocky peninsula is flanked by a sheltered new marina and an old fishing port. The town of Perros-Guirec is home to three sandy beaches offering panoramic views of the Seven Islands.

Offshore from Perros-Guirec lies the Seven Islands Archipelago, the largest bird refuge in France. This haven for birds is home to twenty seven different species, including the Atlantic puffins.
The town lies in the heart of the la Côte de Granit Rose, an area of exceptional beauty, a natural landscape of spectacular rock formations carved out by centuries of wind and waves. The nearby coastal walk Sentier des Douaniers is one of the famous walks of Brittany.
The town boasts two historic churches. Saint Jacques in the centre of town is built of pink granite and Notre Dame de la Clarté whose eighteen century spire acted as a landmark for sailors lost in fog.
Joseph Conrad lived here for several years and wrote many of his most famous maritime books during that period.